GAS PANIC: Packed Tourist Hotspot Beachy Head Evacuated – 238 People ‘Decontaminated’ In Hospital (Video)

GAS PANIC: Packed Tourist Hotspot Beachy Head Evacuated – 238 People ‘Decontaminated’ In Hospital (Video)

The dramatic pictures below show a bizarre haze blowing in from the sea forcing beachgoers to flee.  Locals were told to shut doors and windows across 16-mile section of coastline.

Two Hundred and thirty eight people are now being ‘decontaminated’ in the hospital with HUNDREDS more suffering burning eyes and breathing difficulties after mystery ‘chemical mist’ blew in from the sea at Beachy Head in East Sussex, England.

 

In recent years, people have become quite concerned about the geoengineered aerosols known as chemtrails, because of the toxic chemicals they contain, such as aluminum, barium, cadmium, “chaff,” viruses and zinc. These aerosols, which take the form of smoky clouds, tend to disperse slowly rather than dissipating quickly, becoming wider and wider., Why in the World are they Spraying reported.

Oddly enough, people have had similar concerns about using garment steamers that they have had about these chemtrails. This apparently because they have been lead to believe in the myth that garment steamers cannot operate without the use of chemicals. However, the truth is far from that.

Why Are People Concerned About Chemtrails?

Geoengineering Watch Global Alert News, February 25, 2017

The main reasons people are so concerned about chemtrails is because they have been impacting food and water, polluting the environment, and posing risks of cancer. Billions of megatons of these toxic chemicals are dispersed into the sky on a daily basis, and all organic fruits, livestock, and vegetables that are exposed to the open air get contaminated as a result.

NASA just released balloons holding bacteria into the sky at the time of the solar eclipse, allegedly to study how bacteria would respond to Mars’ surface. According to the Verge, NASA scientists are mailing students bacteria, that will be sent into the stratosphere on the exact path of the eclipse:, Operation Disclosure reported.

“The balloons are being sent up by teams of high school and college students from across the US as part of the Eclipse Ballooning Project, led by Angela Des Jardins of Montana State University. Last week, Smith finished mailing the bacteria — which are not dangerous for people or the environment — to the student groups. (Only 34 of the balloons will carry the bacteria.) The microorganisms are dried onto the surface of two metal cards the size of a dog tag.

One card will fly to the stratosphere, while one will remain on the ground to function as a control group. On eclipse day, the balloons launched every 15 minutes or so from states that are in the path of the Moon’s shadow, Des Jardins says. They’ll fly for about two hours, reaching the stratosphere and eventually popping because of the pressure drop. Once they’re back on the ground (a parachute will slow down descent), the students will track them by GPS, recover the metal tags, and mail them back to NASA.”

The bacteria is a strain called Paenibacillus xerothermodurans, an allegedly resilient bacteria that was discovered outside a spacecraft assembly facility at the Kennedy Space Center in 1973.

While it’s convenient that the NASA effort was allegedly started by students working with Montana State University, the premise doesn’t make sense. The explanation is enough to arouse suspicion.

Why would NASA claim that the Earth’s stratosphere at the time of an eclipse is so similar to Mars? It doesn’t pass as a very likely reason to me. The official line is that colder temperatures and more solar radiation in the stratosphere is similar to Mars, and that the temperature would drop further during the eclipse, but the eclipse is for such a brief moment of time, it doesn’t make sense that this would be about Mars.

Further, the US government has a long history spraying citizens with bacteria and chemicals without their consent.

Terrified sunseekers were left with breathing problems and burning eyes after a mysterious yellow chemical cloud swamped a packed beach and injured more than 200 people, The Daily Mail reports.

Doctors in hazmat suits treated hundreds of holidaymakers with dangerous symptoms including vomiting in contamination tents at Birling Gap, near Beachy Head yesterday.

Youngsters took to Snapchat to post shocking videos of their blood-red eyes as they took cover in their car and complained their eyeballs were ‘burning’ after the toxic plume engulfed the beach.

Doctors in hazmat suits treated more than 200 with breathing problems and burning eyes after a gas cloud hit a Sussex beach

Rebecca Baldock (left) shared a Snapchat of herself and friends Jacob Ward and Scott Smith complaining of streaming and burning eyes. In the footage she says: ‘My eyeballs, my eyeballs’

Youngsters complained their day out had been ruined after the gas left them with dangerous symptoms, including burning eyes

A 16-mile segment of the East Sussex coastline was evacuated and locals were told to shut doors and windows after a yellowish 'chlorine cloud' (above) left people with burning eyes

A 16-mile segment of the East Sussex coastline was evacuated and locals were told to shut doors and windows after a yellowish ‘chlorine cloud’ (above) left people with burning eyes.

Hospital staff were seen wearing protective clothing as they checked patients over in decontamination tents
Witnesses said patients were hosed down and made to change clothes

Hospital staff were seen wearing protective clothing as they checked patients over in contamination tents. Witnesses said patients were hosed down and made to change clothes.

Footage shared on social media shows people on the crowded beach packing up their things and rubbing their eyes as a hazy cloud appeared to drift in from the sea at Birling Gap, near Beachy Head (pictured) in East Sussex - Britain's tallest chalk sea cliffs at 530ft high

Footage shared on social media shows people on the crowded beach packing up their things and rubbing their eyes as a hazy cloud appeared to drift in from the sea at Birling Gap, near Beachy Head (pictured) in East Sussex – Britain’s tallest chalk sea cliffs at 530ft high

A 16-mile segment of the East Sussex coastline was evacuated on Sunday afternoon and locals urged to shut their doors and windows after the cloud left beachgoers with the concerning symptoms.

The coastguard, police, ambulances and fire and rescue crews were all at the worst affected area close to tourist hotspot Beachy Head.

With another fine day expected for Bank Holiday Monday, thousands of people are expected to flock to the south coast today.

Police say the haze has now dispersed although questions remain as to what it was and where it came from.

People living 15 miles eastwards had reported smelling chlorine in the air which caused burning eyes and stinging throats.

Rebecca Baldock shared a video from a car as she and her friends, Jacob Ward and Scott Smith, complained of streaming and burning eyes.

In the footage she can be heard saying: ‘My eyeballs, my eyeballs.’

She told Mirror Online: ‘We were on the beach in Eastbourne and we were just about to leave and all our eyes were itching and red. We couldn’t see and we thought it was because we’d been swimming in the sea but as we got further towards the steps of the beach everyone was holding their eyes and there was a mist rolling in.

‘The coastguard medics said it was a chemical irritant in the air and for everyone to get off the beach and out of the area as quick as. We used the medic centre to try wash our eyes but we all still have really red sore eyes.

‘The medics recommended we washed our eyes out with cold water and said we could stay to wait for an ambulance but we wanted to get out of the area.’

Rebecca Baldock took to Snapchat to post shocking videos of her blood-red eyes
Youngsters said their eyeballs were burning

Rebecca Baldock took to Snapchat to post shocking videos of her blood-red eyes, complaining her eyeballs were burning as the gas plume engulfed the beach

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