George Soros Exposed: Behind Obama Policy That Made Illegals ‘Refugees’

George Soros Exposed: Behind Obama Policy That Made Illegals ‘Refugees’

There has been a lot of speculation over the years about how much influence George Soros has over world leaders and until now, it’s been mostly speculative or considered a conspiracy theory.

According to WND, George Soros influenced the Obama administration’s decision to redefine the flood of illegal immigration in 2014 from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador as a “refugee crisis” rather than a criminal-justice issue, according to internal documents from Soros-run organizations released by the “hacktivist” group DCLeaks.

Soros called for the establishment of U.S. immigration processing centers in each of the three Central American countries to transport “migrant refugees” to the United States at American taxpayer expense, emphasizing the dangers faced by “unaccompanied minors” trying to cross the border and the need to reunite families.

The documents were among the 2,500 released by the DCLeaks website, which, says it was “launched by the American hacktivists who respect and appreciate freedom of speech, human rights and government of the people.”

A book-length publication produce for Soros’ Open Society Institute stated: “Over the past several months, we worked to insert a new idea into immigration debate in light of the unaccompanied children crisis.”

The publication contained various materials from the “Final Board Book” produced for the Open Society Institute’s U.S. Programs Board, UPS, meeting held in New York City from Sept. 29-30, 2014.

“Working with a concept initiated by George Soros, we undertook an intense effort to develop and promote a policy option for the administration which would have dramatically expanded the process by which unaccompanied children from the three Central American countries could gain access the United States,” the publication said.

“This concept, based on family reunification principles, reflected both an interest in providing an immediate solution to a pressing and unexpected development as well as an effort to inject new ideas into the staid immigration debate that now exists,” the publication continued, referring to a “concept note” prepared by Doris Meissner, a senior fellow and director for U.S. immigration policy programs at the Soros-funded Migration Policy Institute in Washington, D.C.

The institute’s aim is to “bring about an illegal immigrant resettlement policy and increase social welfare benefits for illegals.”

“The arrival of tens of thousands of unaccompanied children from Central America at the U.S.-Mexico border has shined a spotlight on an aspect of unauthorized migration to the U.S. that has been occurring for decades but has surged in recent months, overwhelming the government’s existing capacity to respond,” Meissner stated in the first sentence of a “concept note” dated Aug. 26, 2014.

“A tangle of explanations exist for the new scale of the flow: divided families, special legal protections, and hearing backlogs in the U.S.,” Meissner continued. “In Central America, the sources are rising levels of cartel and gang violence, lack of jobs and opportunity, and smugglers who exploit all of the above with a lucrative new business model.”

Referencing the U.S. Refugee Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-212) that incorporated into U.S. law United Nations-endorsed international law definitions of political refugees, Meissner suggested the problem of the “new flows of children and youths from the northern triangle countries of Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador” could be solved by establishing U.S. immigration “refugee and humanitarian relief processing centers” within the three countries.

The goal of the U.S. immigration centers would be to “provide a meaningful, enduring lifeline to those in severe danger, especially young people under age 18 who have a parent or close relative sponsor in the U.S.” by establishing procedures under which the U.S. government could transport the Central American minors to the U.S., provided relatives already in the U.S. could be identified.

The centers would “approve for U.S. resettlement or family unification” Central American “refugees” who could be processed in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador for U.S. taxpayer-paid transportation to the United States that would obviate the need to cross the southern border illegally on foot.

The published 2014 OSI UPS meeting summaries emphasize the Soros-suggested policy innovation resulted from a fundamental conclusion that a deadlock in Congress has made passing comprehensive immigration reform impossible, at least pending the outcome of the 2016 presidential and congressional elections.



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