Obama Refers to Himself 96 Times in 18 Minute Speech – Even Quotes Himself (Video)

Obama Refers to Himself 96 Times in 18 Minute Speech – Even Quotes Himself (Video)

All hail the Narcissist in Chief…

During an appearance at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation “Goalkeepers” conference Wednesday, Barack Obama referred to himself 96 times during his 18-minute speech.

Obama could not praise himself enough saying “I” 78 times and “me” or “my”, and to the joy of his adoring fans, he repeatedly quoted himself.

Via American Mirror:

Praising the Gates’ action on “climate change,” Obama said, “We can figure it out. It can be done. And that spirit, that spirit that says, to quote, I guess, myself, ‘Yes we can,’” triggered laughs and cheers from the crowd.

After Obama went on a stem winder of a response during a Q & A portion, he wrapped it up by saying, “The last thing I’ll say so that I don’t sound like I’m still in the U.S. Senate and filibustering…” before offering a point, which he called a “profound one.”

While talking about his days in Chicago, Obama recalled them in the ever humble Obamaeqsue fashion.

“My early work as a community organizer in Chicago taught me an incredible amount, but I didn’t set the world on fire,” he said.

Obama repeatedly talked about “my staff” and reminded the audience at least five times that he was president.

All told, Obama talked about himself 96 times during the roughly 48-minute appearance.

He said “I” 78 times, and “me” or “my” 18 times.

It was not disclosed how much Obama or his foundation was paid for his appearance.

Perhaps Obama should return to Chicago and address the growing concern that by 2016, Chicago had recorded more homicides and shooting victims than New York City and Los Angeles combined.

H/T Gateway Pundit

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