CIA Wrote Code ‘To Impersonate’ Russia’s Kaspersky Lab Anti-Virus Company, WikiLeaks Says (Video)

CIA Wrote Code ‘To Impersonate’ Russia’s Kaspersky Lab Anti-Virus Company, WikiLeaks Says (Video)

Is your TV spying on you?  It’s quite possible.  A Wikileaks dump revealed fears that smart TV’s, particularly some Samsung models, are able to be used by the CIA and others for eavesdropping while other features of your set may be collecting data as well for advertising purposes.
According to documents inside the cache, a CIA program named “Weeping Angel” provided the agency’s hackers with access to Samsung Smart TVs, allowing a television’s built-in voice control microphone to be remotely enabled while keeping the appearance that the TV itself was switched off, called “Fake-Off mode.” Although the display would be switched off, and LED indicator lights would be suppressed, the hardware inside the television would continue to operate, unbeknownst to the owner.
The method, co-developed with British intelligence, required implanting a given TV with malware—it’s unclear if this attack could be executed remotely, but the documentation includes reference to in-person infection via a tainted USB drive.
Once the malware was inside the TV, it could relay recorded audio data to a third party (presumably a server controlled by the CIA) through the included network connection,  
WikiLeaks said its cache included more than 8,000 documents originating from within the CIA and came via a source, who the group did not identify, who was concerned that the agency’s “hacking capabilities exceed its mandated powers,” and who wanted to “initiate a public debate” about the proliferation of cyberweapons.
WikiLeaks said the documents also showed extensive hacking of smartphones, including Apple’s iPhones; a large library of allegedly serious computer attacks that were not reported to tech companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft; malware from hacker groups and other nation-states, including, WikiLeaks said, Russia, that could be used to hide the agency’s involvement in cyberattacks; and the growth of a substantial hacking division within the CIA, known as the Center for Cyber Intelligence, bringing the agency further into the sort of cyberwarfare traditionally practiced by its rival the National Security Agency, The Intercept reported.
In today’s world, if someone you know seems to know a little too much about your life, they could be spying on you as you read this article.
The Obama administration isn’t accused of gathering intelligence information to spy for political, and other, purposes just once. Or twice. Or even just three times, Truth Uncensored reported.

Everything We Know About NSA Spying: “Through a PRISM, Darkly” – Kurt Opsahl at CCC

The CIA is has also developed code to impersonate Russian anti-virus giant ‘Kaspersky Labs,” According to Wikileaks.
No technology is safe from the government.
RT reports: WikiLeaks says it has published the source code for the CIA hacking tool ‘Hive,’ which indicates that the agency-operated malware could mask itself under fake certificates and impersonate public companies, namely Russian cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab, The Gateway Pundit reports:

The CIA multi-platform hacking suite ‘Hive’ was able to impersonate existing entities to conceal suspicious traffic from the user being spied on, the source code of the malicious program indicates, WikiLeaks said on Thursday.

The extraction of information would therefore be misattributed to an impersonated company, and at least three examples in the code show that Hive is able to impersonate Russian cybersecurity company Kaspersky Lab, WikiLeaks stated.

As The Gateway Pundit’s Carter Brown previously reported, WikiLeaks published over 600more files back in March claiming to show the CIA used extensive measures to hide its hacking attacks and make it look like Russia, China, North Korea, or Iran carried out the attacks.

The Vault 7 tranche of files and code WikiLeaks continues to drop gives us a better look at what the CIA’s ‘Marble’ software is and how it carries out its attacks.

The code traverses a number of languages from Arabic to Chinese, to Korean, Farsi (the language of the Iranians), and Russian.

The UK Daily Mail reports:

It says: ‘This would permit a forensic attribution double game, for example by pretending that the spoken language of the malware creator was not American English, but Chinese.’

This could lead forensic investigators into wrongly concluding that CIA hacks were carried out by the Kremlin, the Chinese government, Iran, North Korea or Arabic-speaking terror groups such as ISIS.

VIDEO:

 

WikiLeaks says it has published the source code for the CIA hacking tool ‘Hive,’ which indicates that the agency-operated malware could mask itself under fake certificates and impersonate public companies, namely Russian cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab.

The CIA multi-platform hacking suite ‘Hive’ was able to impersonate existing entities to conceal suspicious traffic from the user being spied on, the source code of the malicious program indicates, WikiLeaks said on Thursday.

The extraction of information would therefore be misattributed to an impersonated company, and at least three examples in the code show that Hive is able to impersonate Russian cybersecurity company Kaspersky Lab, WikiLeaks stated, RT reports.

If the target organization looks at the network traffic coming out of its network, it is likely to misattribute the CIA exfiltration of data to uninvolved entities whose identities have been impersonated,” WikiLeaks said in a statement.

WikiLeaks began to publish documents on Hive in April this year, exposing the elaborate malware suite used by the CIA to hack, record and even control modern hi-tech appliances worldwide. Kaspersky Lab has repeatedly been accused by US officials of being involved in alleged Russian state-run hacking of the US presidential election.

WikiLeaks began to publish ‘Hive’ documents in April this year, exposing the elaborated malware suite used by the CIA to hack, record and even control modern hi-tech appliances worldwide. The most recent revelations are particularly interesting, as Kaspersky Lab has been repeatedly accused by US officials of being involved in the alleged Russian state-supervised hacking plot.

In September, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) ordered all government agencies to stop using the company’s products and remove them from computers, citing “information security risks presented by the use of Kaspersky products on federal information systems.” Kaspersky Lab has repeatedly denied cooperating with any government entity including Russia, stating that its products simply cannot be used for spying as they lack any functionality beyond the advertised one. In an unprecedented move, the company even opened its source code to independent review last month.

WikiLeaks claims that the release of this new batch of confidential documents on the CIA exceeds the amount published during the NSA-Snowden leaks.

The release is expected to completely rattle the CIA.

The timing of the release by WikiLeaks is particularly noteworthy. Former DNC head Donna Brazile is currently promoting her book, alleging Russia hacked her party’s servers, stealing mass amounts of voter intel and internal communications.

In her new book, “Hacks: The Inside Story of the Break-ins and Breakdowns that Put Donald Trump in the White House,” Democrat operative Donna Brazile admits the DNC allowed alleged Russian hackers to steal data from the party’s servers.

Brazile claims the only way to have blocked Russian hackers from DNC servers was to rebuild them. This is impossible to do, as it would have impacted the party’s ability to ‘manage the primaries.’

Daily Caller reports:

In May, when CrowdStrike recommended that we take down our system and rebuild it, the DNC told them to wait a month, because the state primaries for the presidential election were still underway, and the party and the staff needed to be at their computers to manage these efforts,” Brazile wrote in her new book, “Hacks.”

“For a whole month, CrowdStrike watched Cozy Bear and Fancy Bear operating. Cozy Bear was the hacking force that had been in the DNC system for nearly a year.”

Cozy Bear and Fancy Bear are cybersecurity firms that have reported ties with Russian hackers. Both groups are blamed for the hacks on the DNC in 2016. CrowdStrike is a private U.S. cybersecurity firm that oversaw the protection of the DNC’s servers.

As The Gateway Pundit previously reported, Donna Brazile says Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz was unusually calm after the so called DNC hack occurred.

According to Brazile:

On June 14 Debbie invited the Democratic Party officers to a conference call to alert us that a story about hacking the DNC that would would be published in the Washington Post the following day. That call was the first time we’d heard that there was a problem. Debbie’s tone was so casual that I had not absorbed the details, nor even thought that it was much for us to be concerned about. Her manner indicated that this hacking thing was something she had covered. But had she?

Brazile reveals former top Obama official Susan Rice noted in relation to the ‘hack,’ that “It took a long time for the FBI to get any response from the party.”

In June, Wasserman Schultz claimed that neither the FBI nor any other government agency contacted her about the hacking of the DNC’s computer networks. The former DNC’s claim was rebuffed by former DHS head Jeh Johnson, who testified to the House Intelligence Committee that the FBI reached out to help the DNC, but opted to reply on a private cybersecurity company for assistance.

It begs the question…

Was Wasserman Schultz unusually calm about the situation because the ‘hack,’ was not actually a hack?

Photo:  Bing

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