Donald Trump On ‘The Economist’ Talks Economy, Race Relations And Making America Great Again [Full Interview]

Donald Trump On ‘The Economist’ Talks Economy, Race Relations And Making America Great Again [Full Interview]

Donald Trump, who has become the surprise Republican frontrunner early on in the 2016 US presidential race talked about race relations, the economy and Obama in an in-depth interview with ‘The Economist.’

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In the wide-ranging interview with The Economist, Trump told the magazine that America is “sitting on many powder kegs” as a result of the Obama presidency.

“Obama is the great divider, he has totally used race. And it should have been the other way around. He had an opportunity to unify and he didn’t do that,” he said.

“We are sitting on many powder kegs. Whether it’s Ferguson, or St. Louis, or like the other night, or Baltimore. Or different parts of Chicago,” Trump said, adding that race relations are “almost as bad as they have ever been in the history of the country.”

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“You asked about race relations, I think they’re very tense. I think that Obama has divided the country as far as race relations are concerned, and I think that you have certain sections, and you have lots of different locations within this country that potentially are powder kegs,” Trump said.

Listen to the full interview.

A full transcript of the telephone interview is available HERE.


 

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