Ex-Mexico Prez: We’re Not Building Trump’s ‘Stupid Wall’

Ex-Mexico Prez: We’re Not Building Trump’s ‘Stupid Wall’

Mexico’s former President Felipe Calderón responded to Donald Trump’s plan to build a wall and that Mexico will pay for it by saying, “we are not going to pay any single cent for such a stupid wall!”

texas-mexico-border

Calderón went on to say that “it’s going to be completely useless,” insisting that “They [Mexicans] don’t want to go, they can work for a [U.S.] motor company (that’s) not in Detroit, I am sorry to say,” said Calderón about the fact that fewer Mexicans want to go to the U.S. “They are working for a motor company in Hermosillo and Toluca, so Mazda is coming to Mexico, Honda is coming to Mexico. Those kids have jobs in that industry in Mexico.”

WND reported that Calderón also provided tough talk about the Republican presidential race during his conversation with CNBC’s Hadley Gamble, saying it was “incredible” that quite an “admirable society” like the U.S. had candidates like Trump, NBC News reported.

“No offense, no offense to America. So Donald Trump … is ambitious but not exactly very well-informed man, I don’t want to say ignorant, but he is not very well informed,” said Calderón.

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The former Mexican president said, “The first loser of such a policy would be the United States. If this guy pretends that closing the borders to anywhere either for trade [or] for people is going to provide prosperity to the United States, he is completely crazy.”

Calderón also took issue with Trump’s statements that illegal immigration from Mexico is a big and escalating problem. According to a Pew Research report in November, more Mexicans were leaving the U.S. than entering.

“They don’t want to go, they can work for a motor company (that’s) not in Detroit, I am sorry to say,” said Calderón about the fact that fewer Mexicans want to go to the U.S. “They are working for a motor company in Hermosillo and Toluca, so Mazda is coming to Mexico, Honda is coming to Mexico. Those kids have jobs in that industry in Mexico.”

Calderón’s statements did not address the fact that huge increases in the numbers of Central Americans arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border have occurred over the last three years.

Trump has made border issues and immigration the foundation of his campaign, along with stopping secret trade deals. He issued a bombshell on the day he announced he was running that Mexico was “Not sending its best” to the U.S. but was sending many “rapists” and “criminals.”

The remarks set off an avalanche of condemnations from pro-immigrant groups while others severed their business relationships with Trump, including one with NBC.

But as soon as Trump made illegal immigration the cornerstone of his campaign, his poll numbers started soaring and catapulted him into the front-runner’s position. He suffered a setback in Iowa, finishing second to Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and barely fended off Sen. Marco Rubio, who soared to a close third in Iowa.

Trump is hoping to reverse that momentum in New Hampshire, where the latest polls show he maintains a double-digit lead.

Trump further enhanced his position as the favorite son of anti-establishment voters when, after the San Bernardino terrorist attack by a jihadist husband and wife team, he called for a temporary ban on Muslim immigration.


 

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