House GOP Will Subpoena FBI For Millions Of Missing Hillary Clinton Documents

House GOP Will Subpoena FBI For Millions Of Missing Hillary Clinton Documents

Hillary Clinton’s email investigation is far from over, as a matter of fact – it’s about to begin.

Hillary Clinton probably thought that her email scandal was long behind her and that her allies at the FBI had things under control, and that might have been the case – had she become president.

Revelations about how dirty cop James Comey handled the investigation, and how fired former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe handled the FBI’s probe into Clinton’s email usage, along with leaking information to the media is bringing it all to the forefront.

And let’s not forget about FBI lovebirds Special Agent Peter Strzok and his mistress, FBI attorney Lisa Page’s text messages showing how tainted the top was in favor of Clinton and determined to do whatever was necessary to hurt President Trump.

Hillary Clinton’s email investigation is far from over, as a matter of fact – it’s about to begin.

Fox Business reports:

If the FBI does not turn over more than one million missing documents related to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server, House Judiciary Committee chair Bob Goodlatte plans to subpoena the federal spy agency.

“We need to have those documents,” Rep. Goodlatte (R-Va.) told Maria Bartiromo Sunday on “Sunday Morning Futures.” “The department and the bureau have been slow, very slow, in getting them to us.”

Over the course of the last year, Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz has been reviewing the FBI and DOJ’s actions related to its investigation into Clinton’s use of a private email server, which haunted her during the 2016 presidential election. Horowitz suggested the report will be made available to lawmakers in April.

Horowitz’s team has interviewed dozens of people and reviewed about 1.2 million records during the investigation, but said the classified information involved has slowed the process. So far, Congress has only seen a “tiny percentage” of the texts and documents – 3,000 of 1.2 million that were procured, he said.

“And that’s regrettable, because while the work of the inspector general is important, and we’re looking forward to seeing his report, his responsibility and the Congress’ responsibilities in conducting oversight over the nation’s most important, premier law enforcement is also important,” Goodlatte said.

The review is intended to determine whether the Justice Department’s Assistant Attorney General for Legislative Affairs Peter Kadzik “improperly disclosed non-public information to the Clinton campaign,” and therefore should have been recused from the original investigation. Kadzik previously worked as an attorney for Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta.

The investigation already has made waves in Washington, D.C.: Attorney General Jeff Sessions fired former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe on Friday night, reportedly because Horowitz had determined that McCabe was not forthcoming in regard to the handling of the FBI’s probe into Clinton’s email usage, leaked information to the media and had ties to the Democratic Party.

McCabe denied the accusations, and warned in a lengthy statement that it was politically motivated because he corroborated former FBI Director James Comey’s claims that Trump tried to pressure him into ending the Russia probe.

“Those are very serious concerns, and they tie into the overall concern about how the FBI handled investigations into the elections last year,” Goodlatte said. “The steps are appropriate.”

The inspector general’s review also uncovered anti-Trump texts sent by FBI official Peter Strzok, who called Trump an “idiot” and wrote that they “can’t take the risk” of a Trump victory.

Although the FBI removed Strzok, a member of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into whether Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election, Strzok was, at one point, instrumental. He interviewed former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, and during the presidential campaign, interviewed several Hillary Clinton staffers — including Huma Abedin and Cheryl Mills — about her use of a private email server as secretary of state.


 

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