Mia Farrow Calls for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to Resign

Mia Farrow Calls for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to Resign

“And another thing is painfully clear all over again Clarence Thomas has no business on the Supreme Court. He should resign,” Mia Farrow wrote.

Hollywood actress Mia Farrow took to Twitter on Sunday and attacked Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas calling on him to “resign” his position on the country’s highest court.

Farrow based her outlandish demand on the controversy surrounding Anita Hill who had accused Thomas of sexual harassment while the pair worked together at the Department of Education and at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Thomas was sworn in on October 23, 1991, he is currently the most senior justice on the Court following the retirement of Anthony Kennedy.

“And another thing is painfully clear all over again Clarence Thomas has no business on the Supreme Court. He should resign,” Mia Farrow wrote.

Not everyone agrees with Farrow’s accretion that Judge Clarence resign.

https://twitter.com/Olsaintniklebag/status/1044301952664956928

Breitbart reports:

It’s not apparent that Farrow’s tweet was part of a longer thread but it did come hours before her son, Ronan Farrow, published a New Yorker article which included allegations of inappropriate drunken behavior by Judge Brett Kavanaugh by Deborah Ramirez. Ramirez told the paper she had “significant gaps in her memories” regarding the encounter in question. Ramirez, college best friend admits, “I never heard of it.”

The woman’s allegations come weeks after Christine Blasey Ford accused Kavanaugh of groping her at a party in the summer of 1982, when he was 17-years-old. Four people Ford said were present at the 1982 party have either said they have no knowledge of the alleged event or have denied her account.

Clarence Thomas, who was nominated in July 1991 by President George H. W. Bush to replace the deceased Justice Thurgood Marshall, the Court’s first black justice. Anita Hill had accused Thomas of sexual harassment while the pair worked for the federal government. Thomas’ Senate confirmation hearing was an intense battle that saw several Democratic Senators attack Thomas, who famously described the process as a “circus,” a “national disgrace,” and “as a black American, it is a high-tech lynching for uppity blacks who in any way deign to think for themselves, to do for themselves, to have different ideas, and it is a message that unless you kowtow to an old order, this is what will happen to you. You will be lynched, destroyed, caricatured by a committee of the U.S. Senate rather than hung from a tree.”

“Do you have anything you’d like to say?” then Sen. Joe Biden (D-Del.), the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, asked then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas on Oct. 11, 1991, after Thomas’s former co-worker had testified hours earlier about her alleged sexual harassment by Thomas.

Thomas’s replied as follows:

Senator, I would like to start by saying unequivocally, uncategorically, that I deny each and every single allegation against me today that suggested in any way that I had conversations of a sexual nature or about pornographic material with Anita Hill, that I ever attempted to date her, that I ever had any personal sexual interest in her, or that I in any way ever harassed her.

A second, and I think more important point. I think that this today is a travesty. I think that it is disgusting. I think that this hearing should never occur in America. This is a case in which this sleaze, this dirt, was searched for by staffers of members of this committee, was then leaked to the media, and this committee and this body validated it and displayed it at prime time over our entire nation.

How would any member on this committee, any person in this room, or any person in this country, would like sleaze said about him or her in this fashion? Or this dirt dredged up and this gossip and these lies displayed in this manner? How would any person like it?

The Supreme Court is not worth it. No job is worth it. I am not here for that. I am here for my name, my family, my life, and my integrity. I think something is dreadfully wrong with this country when any person, any person in this free country would be subjected to this.

A second, and I think more important point. I think that this today is a travesty. I think that it is disgusting. I think that this hearing should never occur in America. This is a case in which this sleaze, this dirt, was searched for by staffers of members of this committee, was then leaked to the media, and this committee and this body validated it and displayed it at prime time over our entire nation.

How would any member on this committee, any person in this room, or any person in this country, would like sleaze said about him or her in this fashion? Or this dirt dredged up and this gossip and these lies displayed in this manner? How would any person like it?

The Supreme Court is not worth it. No job is worth it. I am not here for that. I am here for my name, my family, my life, and my integrity. I think something is dreadfully wrong with this country when any person, any person in this free country would be subjected to this.

This is not a closed room. There was an FBI investigation. This is not an opportunity to talk about difficult matters privately or in a closed environment. This is a circus. It’s a national disgrace.

And from my standpoint as a black American, as far as I’m concerned, it is a high-tech lynching for uppity blacks who in any way deign to think for themselves, to do for themselves, to have different ideas, and it is a message that unless you kowtow to an old order, this is what will happen to you. You will be lynched, destroyed, caricatured by a committee of the U.S. — U.S. Senate, rather than hung from a tree.


 

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