Obama Pledges U.S. Military To Protect Iran From Aggressors Opposed To The Nuke Deal

Obama Pledges U.S. Military To Protect Iran From Aggressors Opposed To The Nuke Deal

The United States and its partners have just become international protectors of the Iranian nuclear program.

Obama and other world leaders will teach Iran how to detect and prevent active threats to its nuclear program, according to the parameters of the deal reached to rein in Iran’s contested nuclear program.

obama-iran-680x365

It was revealed that Obama has pledged the United States military to protect Iranian nuclear facilities against any and all aggressive moves from Israel, and any other nations like Saudi Arabia who oppose the deal.

Critics of Obama suggested that he wasted an opportunity at the height of the nuclear negotiations to secure the release of American prisoners before agreeing to the final pact.

Iran has incarcerated three American citizens — Amir Hekmati, 31, Saeed Abedini, 35, and Jason Rezaian, 39. A fourth, Robert A. Levinson, 67, has been missing since he vanished in Iran eight years ago.

The imprisoned Americans and their families and supporters have asserted that they are innocent of any wrongdoing and have accused Iran of using them as hostages to gain concessions from the United States.

Iran has accused all three, in varying degrees of severity, of harmful acts against the country. It considers them to be Iranians because they have family ties in Iran. The Iranian officials have said they know nothing about the whereabouts of Mr. Levinson, a retired F.B.I. agent.

Iranian President Rouhani had cause to celebrate the deal and spoke about his victory in a speech that detailed how the country received everything it was looking for from Obama and the United States.

The Washington Free Beacon reported:

Under the terms of a deal that provides Iran billions of dollars in sanctions relief, Iran and global powers will cooperate to help teach Iran how to manage its nuclear infrastructure, which will largely remain in tact under the deal.

Senior Iranian officials, including the country’s president, celebrated the deal as a victory for the country. Iran’s state controlled media quoted President Hassan Rouhani as saying that the deal will “remove all sanctions while maintaining [Tehran’s] nuclear program and nuclear progress.”

In what is being viewed as a new development, European countries and potentially the United States agreed to “cooperate with Iran on the implementation of nuclear security guidelines and best practices,” according to a copy of the agreement furnished by both the Russians and Iranians.

This will include “training courses and workshops to strengthen Iran’s ability to prevent, protect and respond to nuclear security threats to nuclear facilities and systems as well as to enable effective and sustainable nuclear security and physical protection systems,” according to the text.

Additional “training and workshops” would work to “strengthen Iran’s ability to protect against, and respond to nuclear security threats, including sabotage, as well as to enable effective and sustainable nuclear security and physical protection systems,” the text states.

The language was viewed as disturbing by analysts and experts who said such cooperation could help protect Iran against efforts by the Israelis or other countries to sabotage the Islamic Republic’s nuclear program in the future.

“The United States and its partners have just become the international protectors of the Iranian nuclear program. Instead of rolling back the Iranian nuclear program, we’re now legally obligated to help the Iranians build it up and protect it,” said one Western source present in Vienna and who is apprised of the details of the deal.

In addition to teaching Iran how to protect its nuclear infrastructure, world powers pledge in the agreement to help Iran construct next-generation centrifuges—the machines that enrich uranium—at its once-secret nuclear site in Fordow, where Iran has been suspected of housing a weapons program.

While Iran will not be permitted to enrich nuclear material with these centrifuges, the know-how gained from operating these advanced centrifuges could help it advance clandestine nuclear weapons work, experts say.

The Obama administration had once vowed that Iran would have to fully dismantle its centrifuge program. However, this demand was walked back as the Iranians demanded greater concessions over the past months.

“Now the international community will be actively sponsoring the development of Iranian nuclear technology,” Omri Ceren, an analyst from the Israel Project (TIP), wrote in an email to reporters. “And since the work will be overseen by a great power, it will be off-limits to the kind of sabotage that has kept the Iranian nuclear program in check until now.”

Read the full story at The Washington Free Beacon

 

Total paragraphs: 12
Total paragraphs for ads: 12
Ad locations: , , , , ,

 

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.