Pence: Trump Has A Right To Defend Himself When ‘Icon’ Lewis Calls Him Illegitimate (Video)

Pence: Trump Has A Right To Defend Himself When ‘Icon’ Lewis Calls Him Illegitimate (Video)

Vice-president-elect Mike Pence told Chris Wallace that President-elect Donald Trump has the “right to defend himself” against claims by Civil Rights icon Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) that he is not a “legitimate president.”

“When someone of John Lewis’ stature…someone by virtue of his sacrifice on [Bloody Sunday] crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge and suffered that abuse… use[s] terms like this, it is just deeply disappointing to me,” Pence said.

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Lewis also joined a number of other legislators including Reps. Adriano Espaillat (D-N.Y.), Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.), W. Lacy Clay (D-Mo.) and Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.) who have reportedly announced they will not attend the inauguration, Fox News Insider reported.

“I hope he reconsiders,” Pence said, adding that when Donald Trump criticized Lewis as “all talk, no action” he was referring to the “generations of failed policies” that have come out of Washington during the Georgian’s 30-year tenure in Congress.

Pence said Trump aims to be the president “of all people” and also criticized the release by BuzzFeed of an unverified dossier detrimental to Trump’s character.

Watch the full clip above and let us know in the comments below.


 

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