‘Real Indian’ Running Against Sen. Warren Sues After City Tells Him To Stop Calling Her ‘Fake Indian’ (Video)

‘Real Indian’ Running Against Sen. Warren Sues After City Tells Him To Stop Calling Her ‘Fake Indian’ (Video)

“Only a REAL INDIAN Can Defeat the Fake Indian.” 

Those are the words people see on two large signs that hang on the side of Massachusetts independent U.S. Senate candidate Shiva Ayyadurai’s campaign bus, right next to two large images: one of a stoic Ayyadurai looking into the camera, and another of a closeup of Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth ‘Pocahontas’ Warren wearing a Native American headdress.

Shiva Ayyadurai, a 54-year-old scientist born in Bombay, India, told the Washington Times the city of Camridge, Mass., had ordered him to remove the signs because they were placed “without approvals and permits.” He believes this is the city trying to shut down his right to free speech, which in this case is calling out Warren on her claim that she is part Native American.

On Sunday, Ayyadurai filed a federal lawsuit alleging that the demand from the city of Cambridge violates his constitutional free speech rights, according to The Washington Times.

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Fox News reports:

Since March 17, Ayyadurai’s campaign bus has sported two identical signs picturing himself and a rendition of Warren wearing Indian attire. Emblazoned next to the images are the words: “Only a REAL INDIAN Can Defeat the Fake Indian.”

The bus has reportedly been stationed in a parking lot in front of an office building owned by Ayyadurai, who faces exceptionally long odds, for more than a month — just a mile from Warren’s home.

“The problem with Warren’s story is that none of the evidence supports it.”  – Cherokee genealogist Twila Barnes

Earlier this month, the campaign received a notice from Cambridge building inspector Branden Vigneault that the signs lacked the appropriate “approvals and permits,” according to local reports and the Ayyadurai campaign.

Vigneault threatened fines of $300 per day plus additional legal penalties if the signs remain in place, according to Ayyadurai.

“We will not remove the slogan from our bus,” Ayyadurai told The Washington Times. “We will defend the First Amendment, and we will fight this egregious attack on the First Amendment, at any cost.”

Ayyadurai’s campaign reportedly thinks the building code doesn’t apply to the signs because they’re on a bus, not a structure.

Warren has long been accused of saying she is of Native American heritage to help in securing jobs, including one as a Harvard law professor.

Ayyadurai pioneered sending Elizabeth Warren a DNA test for her to validate her claim that she was Native American. Not once, but on three occasions, he offered her the opportunity to TAKE THE TEST. In this video, Massachusetts citizens, interviewed in Harvard Square agree that she should take the test and that the would vote for a REAL INDIAN!

President Trump has repeatedly called Warren, a Wall Street critic and potential White House rival, “Pocahontas,” a notable American Indian woman in colonial history, to highlight the controversy. Warren has said she ruled out challenging Trump in 2020.

When asked in March whether she’d agree to calls for genetic testing to resolve the heritage controversy, Warren launched into a family history, as purportedly told by her parents and grandparents, before saying, “It’s a part of who I am, and no one’s ever going to take that away.”

Experts have cast doubt on Warren’s claim.

“The problem with Warren’s story is that none of the evidence supports it,” Cherokee genealogist Twila Barnes wrote after researching Warren’s family.

Observers accused Ayyadurai of puffery and distortion. The attacks mostly center on his longstanding claim to be the inventor of e-mail.

In 1978, as a precocious 14-year-old, after completing a special program in computer science at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Science at NYU, Ayyadurai was recruited by the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) as a Research Fellow, where he developed the first electronic emulation of the entire interoffice mail system (Inbox, Outbox, Folders, Address Book, Memo, etc.), which he named “EMAIL,” to invent the world’s first email system, resulting in him being awarded the first United States Copyright for Email, Computer Program for Electronic Mail System, at a time when Copyright was the only protection for software inventions.

Ayyadurai went on to receive four degrees from MIT, including a bachelors in electrical engineering and computer science, and a dual master’s degree in mechanical engineering and visual studies from the MIT Media Laboratory. In 2003, he returned to MIT to complete his doctoral work in systems biology within the Department of Biological Engineering, where he developed CytoSolve®, a scalable computational platform for modeling the cell by dynamic integration of molecular pathways models.

Following his doctoral work, he returned to India on a Fulbright, where he discovered the systems theoretic basis of eastern systems of medicine, resulting in Systems Health®, a new educational program that provides a scientific foundation of integrative medicine. While at MIT, he also developed a pioneering new course called Systems Visualization which integrates systems theory, narrative story telling, metaphor and data visualization to provide visualization of complex systems.

Read more about Shiva Ayyadurai here.


 

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