Texas Secession Resolution Passes GOP Committee

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Texas’ non-binding independence measure headed for full-party vote. The lone Star State will find out on Saturday just how eager its Republicans are to reconstitute the Republic of Texas.

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A state GOP committee in Austin passed a secession resolution on Friday that will require a full-party vote on Saturday. The non-binding measure would gauge the desire among state Republicans to secede, WND reported.

“If the federal government continues to disregard the constitution and the sovereignty of the State of Texas, the State of Texas should reassert its status as an independent nation,” the measure reads, the Chronicle reported Friday.

Douglas Ernst, WND reported:

State Republican Executive Committee member Tanya Robertson of Galveston and Brazoria counties introduced the resolution due to constituents’ demands.

A Declaration of Independence from Mexico was issued March 1, 1836, to found the Republic of Texas. Sam Houston was subsequently elected president and general of the Texas army, which would then take on Mexico’s Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna.

“Let’s make their victory worse than a defeat,” Texas Col. William B. Travis said of Santa Anna’s 4,000-man army as they approached the Alamo in San Antonio, historian Larry Schweikart writes in “A Patriot’s History of the United States.”

Texas would eventually go on to join the Union on Dec. 29, 1845.

If the SREC approves the secession resolution on Saturday, then it will appear on the March 1, 2016, Republican primary ballot.

The Chronicle managed to interview 13 of 40 members of the SREC this week. Six members supported a vote on independence, six opposed, and one declined to comment.

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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1861 that secession is illegal, and Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia wrote to a citizen on the issue in 2006, “If there was any constitutional issue resolved by the Civil War, it is that there is no right to secede. (Hence, in the Pledge of Allegiance, ‘one Nation, indivisible.’),” the Wall Street Journal reported.

Pro-secession Texans would likely prepare its citizens for the federal government’s reaction by citing the Declaration of Independence, signed July 4, 1776.

“Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.”

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2 COMMENTS

  1. There is a right to secession. The Tenth Amendment provides that, “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” Since there is no prohibition on secession by the Constitution to the States, and no authority delegated to the federal government to prevent it, States most definitely retain the right to secede. The only thing the Civil War established was that Lincoln was the worst kind of criminal.

  2. Um, if Texas secedes it won’t be part of the US anymore, so US law won’t apply to it, so it won’t matter if the supreme Court ruled secession illegal or not…

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