‘The Gun Control Song’ Mocks Obama For Pushing Gun Control While ‘Blood Fresh on the Ground’ (Video)

‘The Gun Control Song’ Mocks Obama For Pushing Gun Control While ‘Blood Fresh on the Ground’ (Video)

To the tune of Billy Joel’s “Only The Good Die Young,”satirist Dan Joseph mocks President Obama’s rush to take American’s guns away, while “blood is still fresh on the ground.”

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Breitbart Reports:

On December 16, satirist Dan Joseph released “The Gun Control Song,” mocking President Obama’s habit of responding to high-profile shootings by calling for more gun control while “blood is still fresh on the ground.”

Joseph uses the song to address Obama’s habit of politicizing tragedy—for the purposes of pushing gun control—by calling for gun controls that would not have stopped the shootings in the first place. He also points out the hypocrisy of using the behavior of criminals as a springboard for new laws on law-abiding citizens and points to the foolishness of pretending criminals—who already ignore gun control—could somehow be constrained by more of it.

Joseph’s song is to the tune of Billy Joel’s “Only The Good Die Young.” Early in the song, he sings, “And give that same old speech that you always give, pushing that same old liberal anti-gun narrative, but you can be 100 percent positive that when a crazy person shoots someone, you know Obama’s gonna blame the gun.”

Later in the song, Joseph sings, “So go up to Chicago, stay there a bit, soon you’ll wish you had a concealed carry permit. Because the laws there ain’t worth a bucket of spit, but break into my house and you better run, cause I’m a good guy and I have a gun.”

Photo:  Bing

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